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Welcome to AAPA

by Ed Hagen last modified Jun 30, 2009 04:53 PM
Physical anthropology is a biological science that deals with the adaptations, variability, and evolution of human beings and their living and fossil relatives. Because it studies human biology in the context of human culture and behavior, physical anthropology is also a social science. The AAPA is the world's leading professional organization for physical anthropologists. Formed by 83 charter members in 1930, the AAPA now has an international membership of over 1,700. The Association's annual meetings draw more than a thousand scientists and students from all over the world.

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Student Research Awards Competition 2014

by Ed Hagen last modified Apr 25, 2014 12:29 PM

The American Association of Physical Anthropologists awards five prizes to outstanding poster and podium presentations at the annual meeting whose first author is a student. Prizes are given in honor of Juan Comas, Aleš Hrdlička, Earnest A. Hooton, Mildred Trotter, and Sherwood Washburn. This year, we received a total of 39 submissions, up from 25 last year. Each poster or presentation was reviewed by several members of the Student Affairs Committee, and award winners were announced at the annual Closing Reception on the last evening of the Annual Meetings. Due to the high number of applications and the high quality of the submissions this year, the committee decided to award five “Honorable Mentions” in addition to the names prizes. We greatly appreciate Cambridge University Press, Harvard University Press, and the University of Florida Press for their generous donations to the student prizes.

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Pollitzer Travel Awards 2014

by Ed Hagen last modified Apr 19, 2014 12:16 PM

The William Pollitzer Travel Award. is an award of $500 in honor of Dr. William S. Pollitzer. It is designed to help students defray the costs of attending the AAPA meetings. This award is open to all AAPA student members (undergraduate and graduate). This year, we received a total of 128 submissions for the Pollitzer Travel awards, up 31 submissions from last year. The Student Affairs Committee awarded travel prizes to a total of 50 students in response to the following prompt:

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Symposium: The African Human Fossil Record

Symposium: The African Human Fossil Record

by Ed Hagen last modified Apr 04, 2014 03:59 PM

Since 90 years now, when a nonhuman representative of the hominin lineage was firstly discovered at Taung, in South Africa, we know that Darwin’s prediction of an African emergence of the genus Homo was correct. Since, following the discovery in 1960s of the “early Man” at Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, the human fossil record from African localities chronologically covering nearly the last 2.5 million years has remarkably increased in raw amount and preservation quality of the paleontological and cultural assemblages, anatomical diversity, morphodimensional variation, sex- and age-related individual representativeness of the remains, resolution of the reconstructed geochronological, paleoenvironmental, paleoecological and technocultural contexts.

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The  2nd Annual Western Bioarchaeology Group Conference (WeBiG)

The 2nd Annual Western Bioarchaeology Group Conference (WeBiG)

by Ed Hagen last modified Apr 04, 2014 03:00 PM

October 10th – 11th, 2014. Hosted by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Department of Anthropology. What is WeBiG? It is an annual gathering of grad students and faculty who work on any topic/area in bioarchaeology and forensics at institutions in the western states. It is designed to provide networking opportunities at locations in the west that are easy (and cheap) to get to.

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Evolutionary Aspects of Child Development and Health Workshop

Evolutionary Aspects of Child Development and Health Workshop

by Ed Hagen last modified Mar 31, 2014 09:33 PM

June 3 - 5, 2014, Harbour Centre, Labatt Hall (Room #1700), Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada. The risk of adult heart disease, cancer, and a broad swath of other negative health outcomes may result from exposures during fetal and infant development. Why and how? The field of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) focuses on connections between adult health outcomes and exposures to social and physical challenges experienced during early life.

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American Journal of Physical Anthropology
Commingled and Disarticulated Human Remains: Working Toward Improved Theory, Method, and Data. Edited by Anna J. Osterholtz, Kathryn M. Baustian, and Debra L. Martin. New York, NY: Springer. 2014. 285 pp. ISBN 978-1-4614-7560-6. $129.00 (hardcover). Jul 28, 2014
Paleomobility in the Tiwanaku Diaspora: Biogeochemical analyses at Rio Muerto, Moquegua, Peru Jul 26, 2014
An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections. Edited by Ron Barrett and George J. Armelagos. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2013. 160 pp. ISBN 9780199608294. $59.95. Jul 25, 2014
Rereading The Fossil Record. By David Sepkoski. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press. 2012. 432 pp. ISBN 13:978-0-226-74855. $50.50 (cloth). Jul 25, 2014
Kinematics and spatiotemporal parameters of infant-carrying in olive baboons Jul 25, 2014
Teeth: A Very Short Introduction. By Peter S. Ungar. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2014. 137 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-967059-8. $11.95 (paperback). Jul 25, 2014
Health and disease: Exploring the relation between parasitic infections, child nutrition status, and markets Jul 24, 2014
The function of loud calls (Hoot Series) in wild western gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) Jul 24, 2014
Obituary†: Kenneth alan bennett (October 3, 1935 – February 6, 2014) Jul 24, 2014
Broken Bones: Anthropological Analysis of Blunt Force Trauma. 2nd Edition. Edited by Vicki L. Wedel and Alison Galloway. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas. 2014. 479 pp. ISBN 978-0-398-08768-5 (hardcover). Jul 24, 2014
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